How Do Trainees Rate the Impact of a Short Cognitive Behavioural Training Programme on their Knowledge and Skills?

Michael Duffy, Kate Gillespie, James O'Shea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Background: A strong evidence base for cognitive behavioural therapy has led to CBT models becoming available within mainstream mental health services. As the concept of stepped care develops, new less intensive mental health interventions such as guided self-help are emerging, delivered by staff not trained to the level of accredited Cognitive Behavioural Therapists. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine how mental health staff evaluated the usefulness of a short training programme in CBT concepts, models and techniques for routine clinical practice.
Method: A cohort of mental health staff (n = 102) completed pre- and posttraining self-report questionnaires measuring trainee perceptions of the impact of a short training programme on knowledge and skills. Mentors and managers were also asked to comment on perceived impact of the training.
Results: Trainees and mentors reported perceived gains in knowledge and skills posttraining and at 1-year follow-up. Managers and trainees reported perceived improvements in skills and practice. Conclusion: A short Cognitive Behavioural skills programme can enable mental health staff to integrate basic CB knowledge and skills into routine clinical practice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)653-667
Number of pages15
JournalBehaviour and Cognitive Psychotherapy
Volume42
Issue number06
Early online date21 Jun 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jun 2013

Keywords

  • skills training, short courses, cognitive behavioural therapy, mental health

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