How inclusive is the right to inclusive education? An assessment of the UN convention on the rights of persons with disabilities’ concluding observations

Bronagh Byrne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Across jurisdictions, what does and what does not constitute inclusive education varies. The adoption of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in 2006 provides a critical opportunity to untangle the elasticity of ‘inclusive education’. Using Article 24 CRPD as the normative framework for inclusive education and drawing on a content and critical policy analysis of the Concluding Observations of all countries examined by the CRPD Committee to date, this article systematically explores the emerging trends and foci of the right to inclusive education across the globe and examines their implications for discourse and practice. It will be argued that while the right to inclusive education has become more focused, persistent concerns abound that must be addressed for Article 24 to be effectively realised. In particular, voice must be given to children with the most complex and profound disabilities and for whom the practicalities of inclusive education are more difficult to achieve. Greater focus is also required in achieving a rights-compliant transition from segregated to inclusive education settings that does not, in the process of doing so, rescind the rights of the minority of children with the most profound disabilities currently in segregated schools. These issues need to be explicitly confronted so that the international disability rights framework promotes inclusive education for all children with disabilities and not only for those with the ‘right’ kinds of disabilities.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Inclusive Education
Early online date06 Aug 2019
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 06 Aug 2019

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'How inclusive is the right to inclusive education? An assessment of the UN convention on the rights of persons with disabilities’ concluding observations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this