“I am still a wee bit iffy about how much of a heart attack it really was”. Patients presenting with non ST elevation myocardial infarction lack understanding about their illness: a qualitative study.

Lisa Lusk, Lisa Dullaghan, Mary McGeough, Patrick Donnelly , Donna Fitzsimons

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Background: There are considerable differences
in the type of treatments offered to patients pre
-
senting with acute MI, in terms of the speed and
urgency with which they are admitted to the
catheter laboratory and discharged from hospital.
The impact of these different treatment experi
-
ences on patients’ illness perception and motiva
-
tion for behavioural changes is unknown.
Aim: The aim of this study was to explore and
compare patients’ illness perception and motiva
-
tion for behavioural change following MI treated
by different methods.
Methods: Semi-structured, domiciliary interviews
(n=15), were conducted with three groups of MI
patients within 4 weeks of diagnosis:
(i) Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention –
PPCI (n=5)
(ii) Thrombolysis (n=5)
(iii) Non ST Elevation MI – NSTEMI (n=5)
Themes were identified and refined using the
framework method of analysis and compared
between groups.
Results: Patients who presented with a STEMI and
received either PPCI or thrombolysis had similar
perceptions of their illness as a serious event
and were determined to make lifestyle changes.
In contrast, patients with a NSTEMI experienced
uncertainty about symptoms and diagnosis,
causing misconceptions about the severity of
their condition and less determination for lifestyle
changes.
Conclusion: Patients with NSTEMI in this study
expressed very different perceptions of their
illness than those experiencing STEMI. Patients’
clinical presentation and treatment experience
during an acute myocardial infarction can impact
on their illness perception. Health-care practition
-
ers should consider the potential for such differ
-
ences when individualising secondary preven
-
tion strategies, as illness perception may affect
patients’ motivation for behavioural changes and
uptake of cardiac rehabilitation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages93-93
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2013
EventRoyal College of Nursing International Research Conference - Belfast, United Kingdom
Duration: 20 Mar 2013 → …

Conference

ConferenceRoyal College of Nursing International Research Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBelfast
Period20/03/2013 → …

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