'Ideological content and institutional frameworks: Unionist identities in Northern Ireland and Scotland'

Graham Walker, Christopher Farrington

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    This article examines the complex interactions between British national identity and the territorial identities of Northern Ireland and Scotland. We argue that the current literature on national identities in Britain misunderstands the nature of British identities in Northern Ireland and Scotland. Indeed, much of this literature wrongly defines Unionists in both of these areas. By examining the content of British national identity, a comparison of Scotland and Northern Ireland reveals that Unionism finds political significance through an ideological project committed to the Union. However, we also have to account for the differences in the Unionist ideology of Scotland and Northern Ireland. We argue that the institutional framework in which these identities and ideologies are exercised explains this variation. Overall, we argue that the debate on nationalism in the United Kingdom has not adequately shown how the integrative functions of British national identity can co-exist with the separatist nature of territorial national identity.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)135-152
    Number of pages18
    JournalIrish Studies Review
    Volume17
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2009

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of ''Ideological content and institutional frameworks: Unionist identities in Northern Ireland and Scotland''. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this