Imaging the genetics of executive function

C.M. Greene, W. Braet, Katherine Johnson, M.A. Bellgrove

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent advances in neuroimaging technologies have allowed ever more detailed studies of the human brain. The combination of neuroimaging techniques with genetics may provide a more sensitive measure of the influence of genetic variants on cognitive function than behavioural measures alone. Here we present a review of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of genetic links to executive functions, focusing on sustained attention, working memory and response inhibition. In addition to studies in the normal population, we also address findings from three clinical populations: schizophrenia, ADHD and autism spectrum disorders. While the findings in the populations studied do not always converge, they all point to the usefulness of neuroimaging techniques such as fMRI as potential endophenotypes for parsing the genetic aetiology of executive function. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-42
Number of pages13
JournalBiological Psychology
Volume79
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2008

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Executive Function
Neuroimaging
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Population
Endophenotypes
Genetic Techniques
Short-Term Memory
Cognition
Schizophrenia
Technology
Brain

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Greene, C. M., Braet, W., Johnson, K., & Bellgrove, M. A. (2008). Imaging the genetics of executive function. Biological Psychology, 79(1), 30-42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2007.11.009
Greene, C.M. ; Braet, W. ; Johnson, Katherine ; Bellgrove, M.A. / Imaging the genetics of executive function. In: Biological Psychology. 2008 ; Vol. 79, No. 1. pp. 30-42.
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Greene, CM, Braet, W, Johnson, K & Bellgrove, MA 2008, 'Imaging the genetics of executive function', Biological Psychology, vol. 79, no. 1, pp. 30-42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2007.11.009

Imaging the genetics of executive function. / Greene, C.M.; Braet, W.; Johnson, Katherine; Bellgrove, M.A.

In: Biological Psychology, Vol. 79, No. 1, 09.2008, p. 30-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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