Immunomodulatory molecules of Fasciola hepatica: Candidates for both vaccine and immunotherapeutic development

John P Dalton, Mark W Robinson, Grace Mulcahy, Sandra M O'Neill, Sheila Donnelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

100 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, causes fascioliasis in domestic animals (sheep, cattle), a global disease that is also an important infection of humans. As soon as the parasite invades the gut wall its interaction with various host immune cells (e.g. dendritic cells, macrophages and mast cells) is complex. The parasite secretes a myriad of molecules that direct the immune response towards a favourable non-protective Th2-mediate/regulatory environment. These immunomodulatory molecules, such as cathepsin L peptidase (FhCL1), are under development as the first generation of fluke vaccines. However, this peptidase and other molecules, such as peroxiredoxin (FhPrx) and helminth defence molecule (FhHDM-1), exhibit various immunomodulatory properties that could be harnessed to help treat immune-related conditions in humans and animals.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)272-285
JournalVeterinary Parasitology
Volume195
Issue number3-4
Early online date06 Apr 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Aug 2013

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • veterinary(all)

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