Impaired orthostatic blood pressure recovery and cognitive performance at two-year follow up in older adults: The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing

Joanne Feeney*, Neil O’Leary, Rose Anne Kenny

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)
164 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Prospective investigations of the association between impaired orthostatic blood pressure (BP) regulation and cognitive decline in older adults are limited, and findings to-date have been mixed. The aim of this study was to determine whether impaired recovery of orthostatic BP was associated with change in cognitive function over a 2-year period, in a population based sample of community dwelling older adults. 

Methods: Data from the first two waves of the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing were analysed. Orthostatic BP was measured during a lying to standing orthostatic stress protocol at wave 1 using beat-to-beat digital plethysmography, and impaired recovery of BP at 40 s post stand was investigated. Cognitive function was assessed at wave 1 and wave 2 (2 years later) using the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE), verbal fluency and word recall tasks. 

Results: After adjustment for measured, potential confounders, and multiple imputation for missing data, the change in the number of errors between waves on the MMSE was 10 % higher [IRR (95 % CI) = 1.10 (0.96, 1.26)] in those with impaired recovery at 40 s. However, this was not statistically significant (p = 0.17). Impaired BP recovery was not associated with change in performance on any of the other cognitive measures. 

Conclusions: There was no clear evidence for an association between impaired recovery of orthostatic BP and change in cognition over a 2-year period in this nationally representative cohort of older adults. Longer follow-up and more detailed cognitive testing would be advantageous to further investigate the relationship between orthostatic BP and cognitive decline.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-133
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Autonomic Research
Volume26
Issue number2
Early online date11 Mar 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2016

Keywords

  • Ageing
  • Cognition
  • Longitudinal
  • Orthostatic hypotension
  • Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems

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