Increasing density of rare species of intertidal gastropods: tests of competitive ability compared with common species.

Miguel Matias, M.G. Chapman, A.J. Underwood, Nessa E. O'Connor

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Abstract

Many assemblages contain numerous rare species, which can show large increases in abundances. Common species can become rare. Recent calls for experimental tests of the causes and consequences of rarity prompted us to investigate competition between co-existing rare and common species of intertidal gastropods. In various combinations, we increased densities of rare gastropod species to match those of common species to evaluate effects of intra- and interspecific competition on growth and survival of naturally rare or naturally common species at small and large densities. Rarity per se did not cause responses of rare species to differ from those of common species. Rare species did not respond to the abundances of other rare species, nor show consistently different responses from those of common species. Instead, individual species responded differently to different densities, regardless of whether they are naturally rare or abundant. This type of experimental evidence is important to be able to predict the effects of increased environmental variability on rare as opposed to abundant species and therefore, ultimately, on the structure of diverse assemblages.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-116
JournalMARINE ECOLOGY-PROGRESS SERIES
Volume453
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 07 May 2012

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competitive ability
rare species
gastropod
Gastropoda
testing
intraspecific competition
interspecific competition
rarity
test

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Matias, Miguel ; Chapman, M.G. ; Underwood, A.J. ; O'Connor, Nessa E. . / Increasing density of rare species of intertidal gastropods: tests of competitive ability compared with common species. In: MARINE ECOLOGY-PROGRESS SERIES. 2012 ; Vol. 453. pp. 107-116.
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Increasing density of rare species of intertidal gastropods: tests of competitive ability compared with common species. / Matias, Miguel; Chapman, M.G.; Underwood, A.J.; O'Connor, Nessa E. .

In: MARINE ECOLOGY-PROGRESS SERIES, Vol. 453, 07.05.2012, p. 107-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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