Infra-Éireann and making Ireland Modern pavilions

Gary Boyd (Designer), John McLaughlin (Designer)

Research output: Non-textual formDesign

Abstract

The design and construction of the Irish pavilion for the 14th architectural biennale in Venice 2014 (Infra-Éireann) (fig and its reassembled in expanded form in Ireland as part of the Irish State’s centennial celebrations 1916-2016 (Making Ireland Modern). Working in conjunction with John McLaughlin and JMC Architects, the pavilion was designed to be an adaptable, flexible unit, capable of being situated in a series of different venues and having 'no fixed form'. The pavilion was constructed initially in Venice as a two x five bay structure, then in Ireland (with a commensurate increase in exhibits and artefacts) as a three x five bay structure (7.56 x 12.6 x 6.2). It was erected in: the Bailey Allen Hall, University of Galway; St. Peter's Art Centre, Cork; and in the Real Tennis Court in Dublin. In each the entrance sequence and organisation of the exhibits was altered according the exigencies of the venue.
LanguageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 12 May 2014

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Pavilion
Ireland
Venues
John McLaughlin
Art
Dublin
Tennis
Centennial
Biennials
Cork
Fixed Form
Artifact

Cite this

Boyd, G. (Designer), & McLaughlin, J. (Designer). (2014). Infra-Éireann and making Ireland Modern pavilions. Design
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Research output: Non-textual formDesign

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