Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes

J. J. Ku-Herrera*, F. Avilés, A. Nistal, J. V. Cauich-Rodríguez, F. Rubio, J. Rubio, P. Bartolo-Pérez

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chemically oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto commercial E-glass fibers using a dipping procedure assisted by ultrasonic dispersion. In order to investigate the role of the fiber coating (known as "sizing"), MWCNTs were deposited on the surface of as-received E-glass fibers preserving the proprietary coating as well as onto glass fibers which had the coating deliberately removed. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to assess the distribution of MWCNTs onto the fibers. A rather homogeneous coverage with high density of MWCNTs onto the glass fibers is achieved when the fiber coating is maintained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of the chemical composition of the glass fiber coating suggest that such coating is a complex mixture with multiple oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl, carbonyl and epoxy. FTIR and XPS of MWCNTs over the glass fibers and of a mixture of MWCNTs and fiber coating provided evidence that the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups of the oxidized MWCNTs react with the oxygen-containing functional groups of the glass fiber coating, forming hydrogen bonding and through epoxy ring opening. Hydrogen bonding and ester formation between the functional groups of the MWCNTs and the silane contained in the coating are also possible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)383-392
Number of pages10
JournalApplied Surface Science
Volume330
Early online date12 Jan 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Mar 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carbon Nanotubes
Glass fibers
Carbon nanotubes
Coatings
Functional groups
Hydroxyl Radical
Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy
Fibers
Hydrogen bonds
X ray photoelectron spectroscopy
Ultrasonic dispersion
Oxygen
fiberglass
Silanes
Complex Mixtures
Carbon fibers
Raman spectroscopy
Esters
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Scanning electron microscopy

Keywords

  • Carbon nanotubes
  • Chemical analysis
  • Glass fibers

Cite this

Ku-Herrera, J. J., Avilés, F., Nistal, A., Cauich-Rodríguez, J. V., Rubio, F., Rubio, J., & Bartolo-Pérez, P. (2015). Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes. Applied Surface Science, 330, 383-392. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2015.01.025
Ku-Herrera, J. J. ; Avilés, F. ; Nistal, A. ; Cauich-Rodríguez, J. V. ; Rubio, F. ; Rubio, J. ; Bartolo-Pérez, P. / Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes. In: Applied Surface Science. 2015 ; Vol. 330. pp. 383-392.
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Ku-Herrera, JJ, Avilés, F, Nistal, A, Cauich-Rodríguez, JV, Rubio, F, Rubio, J & Bartolo-Pérez, P 2015, 'Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes', Applied Surface Science, vol. 330, pp. 383-392. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2015.01.025

Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes. / Ku-Herrera, J. J.; Avilés, F.; Nistal, A.; Cauich-Rodríguez, J. V.; Rubio, F.; Rubio, J.; Bartolo-Pérez, P.

In: Applied Surface Science, Vol. 330, 01.03.2015, p. 383-392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Ku-Herrera JJ, Avilés F, Nistal A, Cauich-Rodríguez JV, Rubio F, Rubio J et al. Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes. Applied Surface Science. 2015 Mar 1;330:383-392. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2015.01.025