Interprofessional healthcare collaboration: A qualitative exploration of the facilitators and barriers to effective collaboration in Qatar

Michael Corman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

Introduction: Healthcare in Qatar is undergoing a period of major reform driven by a strong economy and vision for a world-class healthcare system. Interprofessional Education (IPE) and Collaboration (IPC) is promoted by National (Qatar Supreme Council of Health) and international (the World Health Organization) organizations as a way to integrate and improve health care delivery. Purpose: This study explores the barriers and facilitators to interprofessional collaboration and the work involved in collaborating on the front lines from the perspective of healthcare professionals within the context of working in Qatar specifically and the Gulf Region more broadly. Method: Ten healthcare professionals who work in Qatar were interviewed using semi-structured, open-ended interviews (avg. length = 30 min.). Interview questions were structured by phenomenological and ethnographic interviewing techniques. Analysis: The analysis draws attention to complex themes discussed by participants in relation to barriers and facilitators to interprofessional collaboration in Qatar and some of the work strategies involved in activating interprofessional collaboration in Qatar. Discussion/Conclusions: Healthcare workers have positive attitudes towards interprofessional collaboration and recognize the value of this practice. However, barriers exist that make collaboration challenging. Addressing these barriers, building upon the facilitators, and gaining a better understanding of the informal collaborative work that does occur may help encourage IPC in Qatar.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication“Transnational knowledge relations for building knowledge-based gulf societies in a globalized world.”
EditorsJ Rickli, N Noori, R Bertelsen
PublisherThe Gulf Research Centre at Cambridge University
Publication statusAccepted - 01 Feb 2016

Fingerprint

Qatar
Delivery of Health Care
Interviews
Organizations
Education
Health

Keywords

  • Interprofessional Practice
  • Interprofessional Education and Collaboration
  • Barriers
  • Facilitators
  • Qualitative Health Research
  • Work Strategies

Cite this

Corman, M. (Accepted/In press). Interprofessional healthcare collaboration: A qualitative exploration of the facilitators and barriers to effective collaboration in Qatar. In J. Rickli, N. Noori, & R. Bertelsen (Eds.), “Transnational knowledge relations for building knowledge-based gulf societies in a globalized world.” The Gulf Research Centre at Cambridge University.
Corman, Michael. / Interprofessional healthcare collaboration : A qualitative exploration of the facilitators and barriers to effective collaboration in Qatar. “Transnational knowledge relations for building knowledge-based gulf societies in a globalized world.”. editor / J Rickli ; N Noori ; R Bertelsen. The Gulf Research Centre at Cambridge University, 2016.
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Corman, M 2016, Interprofessional healthcare collaboration: A qualitative exploration of the facilitators and barriers to effective collaboration in Qatar. in J Rickli, N Noori & R Bertelsen (eds), “Transnational knowledge relations for building knowledge-based gulf societies in a globalized world.”. The Gulf Research Centre at Cambridge University.

Interprofessional healthcare collaboration : A qualitative exploration of the facilitators and barriers to effective collaboration in Qatar. / Corman, Michael.

“Transnational knowledge relations for building knowledge-based gulf societies in a globalized world.”. ed. / J Rickli; N Noori; R Bertelsen. The Gulf Research Centre at Cambridge University, 2016.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

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Corman M. Interprofessional healthcare collaboration: A qualitative exploration of the facilitators and barriers to effective collaboration in Qatar. In Rickli J, Noori N, Bertelsen R, editors, “Transnational knowledge relations for building knowledge-based gulf societies in a globalized world.”. The Gulf Research Centre at Cambridge University. 2016