Investigating the of Water treatment residuals on Phosphorus mobility derived from biosolid application to Willow coppice

Michael Cairns, Alistair McCracken, Donnacha Doody, Raymond Flynn

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Short rotation willow coppice (SRWC) treatment of biosolids is limited by the oversupply of biosolid derived phosphorus; this can lead to eventual losses of phosphorus to water. Water treatment residuals (WTR), a by-product of potable water treatment, have been identified as a viable soil amendment for mitigation of phosphorus loss. WTR exploit the capacity of internally held aluminium oxide-hydroxide complexes to immobilise labile phosphorus. However indiscriminate additions to plots can result in inadequate control or excessive immobilization of soluble P, leading to crop deficiencies. Four commercially grown common willow (Salix) genotypes (Terra Nova, Endeavour, Resolution and Tora) were grown in soil amended with WTR at five different application rates (0, 10, 25, 50 and 100 tonne ha-1 air-dry basis) in a glasshouse pot experiment. The effects of application rates on plant yields, tissue P concentrations, P uptake and soil labile P availability were measured. Results indicate labile P was reduced with increasing WTR application rates, without any negative agronomic impacts.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 21 Nov 2012
Event17th Biosolids and organic resources conference - Leeds, United Kingdom
Duration: 19 Nov 201221 Nov 2012

Conference

Conference17th Biosolids and organic resources conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLeeds
Period19/11/201221/11/2012

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    Cairns, M., McCracken, A., Doody, D., & Flynn, R. (2012). Investigating the of Water treatment residuals on Phosphorus mobility derived from biosolid application to Willow coppice. Abstract from 17th Biosolids and organic resources conference, Leeds, United Kingdom.