"It is through shared conversation, that I understand"-Māori older adults' experiences of medicines and related services in Aotearoa New Zealand

Joanna Hikaka, Rhys Jones, Carmel Hughes, Nataly Martini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AIM: An understanding of patients' healthcare experiences and perceptions is essential for developing new health services. In Aotearoa New Zealand, inequities in health outcomes exist, with Māori experiencing worse health outcomes than non-Māori. This includes poorer access to, and quality of, prescribed medicines. This study aims to explore kaumātua (Māori older adults') experiences of medicines and medicine-related services in New Zealand. METHOD: This qualitative research applied kaupapa Māori theory and explored Māori older adults' experiences of medicines and medicine-related services in New Zealand. Ten kaumātua from Auckland, New Zealand participated in semi-structured interviews. Reflexive thematic analysis was used to analyse data. RESULTS: Three themes were generated: 1. diverse, multi-dimensional realities of medicine-taking for Māori with ageing; 2. medicines supply as a business transaction; and 3. self-determined agency of kaumātua supported by authentic healthcare partnerships. Kaumātua expressed their ability to retain power and control over their medicine therapy and their desire for this to occur within a supportive, authentic partnership model that involves them and their multiple healthcare providers. CONCLUSION: Māori older adults have the ability, desire and right to control their medicines journey in a way that is relevant to their experiences of medicines. They value support from authentic healthcare partnerships in enabling this.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-46
Number of pages14
JournalThe New Zealand medical journal
Volume133
Issue number1516
Publication statusPublished - 12 Jun 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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