John Punch, Scotist Holy War, and the Irish Catholic Revolutionary Tradition in the Seventeenth Century

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    Abstract

    During the 1640s, the Irish Franciscan theologian John Punch taught his theology students in Rome that war against Protestants was made just by their religion alone. Jesuits like Luis de Molina identified the holy war tradition in which Punch stood as a Scotist one, and insisted that the Scotists had confused the natural and supernatural spheres. Among Irishmen, Punch was unusual. The main Irish Catholic revolutionary tradition employed Jesuit and Thomist theory. They argued that the Stuarts had lost the right to rule Ireland for natural reasons, not supernatural ones; because the Stuarts were tyrants, not because they were Protestants.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)401-421
    Number of pages21
    JournalJournal of the History of Ideas
    Volume77
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2016

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    Holy War
    Jesuits
    Supernatural
    Revolution
    Tyrant
    Rome
    Irishman
    Religion
    Theology
    Teaching
    Ireland
    1640s
    Theologians
    Franciscans
    Thomist

    Cite this

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    abstract = "During the 1640s, the Irish Franciscan theologian John Punch taught his theology students in Rome that war against Protestants was made just by their religion alone. Jesuits like Luis de Molina identified the holy war tradition in which Punch stood as a Scotist one, and insisted that the Scotists had confused the natural and supernatural spheres. Among Irishmen, Punch was unusual. The main Irish Catholic revolutionary tradition employed Jesuit and Thomist theory. They argued that the Stuarts had lost the right to rule Ireland for natural reasons, not supernatural ones; because the Stuarts were tyrants, not because they were Protestants.",
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