Joining the `Crusade against the Giants': Keir Hardie's Fairy Tales and The Socialist Child Reader

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Abstract

This article focuses on Keir Hardie's forgotten fiction and journalism for children, published in his paper The Labour Leader during the 1890s. It argues that Hardie's dialogue with child correspondents was shaped by a socialist periodical culture that redefined reading as a communal, political activity. Relating Hardie's appropriation of fantasy to that of a fellow socialist editor, John Trevor, the article examines the fairy tale as a propaganda tool in the process of `making socialists', but also questions the model of child readers as passive consumers, arguing that young readers were both empowered and controlled by Hardie's journalistic strategies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-49
Number of pages16
JournalLiterature and History
Volume15 (2)
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006

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