'Law of their own': notes on legal alterity in early nineteenth-century Ireland

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Abstract

This article investigates intersections between legal and literary discourse in Ireland in the early 19th century, and explores how judicial tropes, in particular that of an “alternative judiciary”, shape perceptions of Irish identity as well as cultural expression. Whilst Ireland and the Irish were typically characterized as lawless, this article examines the ubiquitous presence of alternative legal systems, focusing on the writings of Thomas Moore (1779–1852) and William Carleton (1794–1869). These representations, and the questions of authority and legitimacy that they provoke, are considered within critical debates about the development of literary forms in Ireland, and the inherent relationship that legal alterity evokes between textual and judicial authority.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)468-478
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Postcolonial Writing
Volume46
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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