Learning about probability from text and tables: Do color coding and labeling through an interactive-user interface help?

Virginia Clinton, Kinga Morsanyi, Martha W. Alibali, Mitchell J. Nathan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
226 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Learning from visual representations is enhanced when learners appropriately integrate corresponding visual and verbal information. This study examined the effects of two methods of promoting integration, color coding and labeling, on learning about probabilistic reasoning from a table and text. Undergraduate students (N = 98) were randomly assigned to learn about probabilistic reasoning from one of 4 computer-based lessons generated from a 2 (color coding/no color coding) by 2 (labeling/no labeling) between-subjects design. Learners added the labels or color coding at their own pace by clicking buttons in a computer-based lesson. Participants' eye movements were recorded while viewing the lesson. Labeling was beneficial for learning, but color coding was not. In addition, labeling, but not color coding, increased attention to important information in the table and time with the lesson. Both labeling and color coding increased looks between the text and corresponding information in the table. The findings provide support for the multimedia principle, and they suggest that providing labeling enhances learning about probabilistic reasoning from text and tables
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages14
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Early online date25 Apr 2016
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 25 Apr 2016

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