Learning how to clarify complex concepts for children through naturalistic inquiry: moving beyond simplification

William Farrelly, Caroline Linse

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

149 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The authors infer that pre-adolescents don’t perform to their intellectual potential, because they aren’t taught how to think and research independently. Teaching to the curriculum has become a requirement and this imposes restrictions on what can be achieved. The contention of this chapter is that a child can formulate effective thought independently through naturalistic inquiry. The question is posed - How do we teach a complex concept to a 6 year old child? The authors hypothesise an experiment thus: given an academic paper, is it possible to explain, without ambiguity, the essence of that paper to a child? The ideas encapsulated in this chapter can be extrapolated for returning adult learners and are particularly relevant to second language acquisition.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSelf-directed learning strategies in adult educational contexts
EditorsFrancesco G. Giuseffi
PublisherIGI Global
Chapter9
Pages183-205
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9781522580195
ISBN (Print)9781522580188
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 05 Apr 2019

Keywords

  • Natural Learning, Primary Education, Higher Order Thinking, Thought, Quality, Criteria, Self-defined Reality, Truth.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Learning how to clarify complex concepts for children through naturalistic inquiry: moving beyond simplification'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this