‘Left to Fend for Themselves’: Immigration, Race Relations and the State in Twentieth Century Northern Ireland

Jack Crangle

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    6 Citations (Scopus)
    671 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Race relations legislation was only introduced to Northern Ireland in 1997, 31 years later than in Britain. This article examines the obstacles and challenges faced by minorities there during the twentieth century. By providing a case study of Northern Ireland, the article shifts the focus away from British inner cities, emphasising that outlying regions – so often overlooked within the context of UK race relations historiography – also had to grapple with issues surrounding race and immigration. The article challenges the notion that Northern Ireland was exclusively white, showing how ethnic minorities there were repeatedly overlooked and excluded.
    Original languageEnglish
    Number of pages25
    JournalImmigrants & Minorities
    Early online date23 Feb 2018
    DOIs
    Publication statusEarly online date - 23 Feb 2018

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of '‘Left to Fend for Themselves’: Immigration, Race Relations and the State in Twentieth Century Northern Ireland'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this