Longitudinal Pathways Between Political Violence and Child Adjustment: The Role of Emotional Security about the Community in Northern Ireland

Robert Cummings, C.E. Merrilees, A.C. Schermerhorn, M.C. Goeke-Morey, Peter Shirlow, E. Cairns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Links between political violence and children's adjustment problems are well-documented. However, the mechanisms by which political tension and sectarian violence relate to children's well-being and development are little understood. This study longitudinally examined children's emotional security about community violence as a possible regulatory process in relations between community discord and children's adjustment problems. Families were selected from 18 working class neighborhoods in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Participants (695 mothers and children, M=12.17, SD=1.82) were interviewed in their homes over three consecutive years. Findings supported the notion that politically-motivated community violence has distinctive effects on children's externalizing and internalizing problems through the mechanism of increasing children's emotional insecurity about community. Implications are considered for understanding relations between political violence and child adjustment from a social ecological perspective.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-224
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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