Look and Tell: Using Photo-Elicitation Methods with Teenagers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article reflects on the usefulness of photo elicitation in research with young people. As part of an Economic and Social Research Council-funded project exploring conflict and divisions in contested cities, teenagers living or attending schools in segregated areas of Belfast were presented with 11 photographs depicting the city's traditional ethno religious divisions, the new ‘post conflict’ consumerist city and youth subcultures. In response to each photo, the young people produced individual written comments and their opinions were fleshed out during follow-up focus group interviews. Drawing on these responses, the strengths and weaknesses of using photo elicitation in research with young people and its capacity to generate new insights into teenagers' spatial perceptions and experiences are outlined.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)629-642
Number of pages14
JournalChildren's Geographies
Volume13
Issue number6
Early online date25 Feb 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 02 Nov 2015

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Research
economic research
subculture
Focus Groups
social research
photograph
Economics
Interviews
interview
economics
school
method
city
young
experience
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conflict
opinion
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Cite this

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Look and Tell: Using Photo-Elicitation Methods with Teenagers. / Leonard, Madeleine; McKnight, Martina.

In: Children's Geographies, Vol. 13, No. 6, 02.11.2015, p. 629-642.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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