Love Thy Neighbor? Relationships between Religion and Racial Intolerance in Europe.

Stefanie Doebler

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article examines relationships between religion and racial intolerance across 47 countries by applying multilevel modeling to European survey data and is the first in-depth analysis of moderation of these relationships by European national contexts. The analysis distinguishes a believing, belonging, and practice-dimension of religiosity. The results yield little evidence of a link between denominational belonging, religious practice, and racial intolerance. The religiosity dimension that matters most for racial intolerance in Europe is believing: believers in a traditional God and believers in a Spirit/Life Force are decidedly less likely, and fundamentalists are more likely than non- believers to be racially intolerant. National contexts also matter greatly: individuals living in Europe’s most religious countries, countries with legacies of ethnic-religious conflict and countries with low GDP are significantly more likely to be racially intolerant than those living in wealthier, secular and politically stable countries. This is especially the case for the religiously devout.
    LanguageEnglish
    Number of pages27
    JournalPolitics and Religion
    Early online date02 Oct 2015
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Fingerprint

    tolerance
    love
    Religion
    religious conflict
    ethnic conflict
    god
    Neighbor Love
    Believer
    Intolerance
    Religiosity
    Deity
    Multilevel Modeling
    Devout
    Religious Practices
    Religious Conflict
    Moderation
    Fundamentalists

    Cite this

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    abstract = "This article examines relationships between religion and racial intolerance across 47 countries by applying multilevel modeling to European survey data and is the first in-depth analysis of moderation of these relationships by European national contexts. The analysis distinguishes a believing, belonging, and practice-dimension of religiosity. The results yield little evidence of a link between denominational belonging, religious practice, and racial intolerance. The religiosity dimension that matters most for racial intolerance in Europe is believing: believers in a traditional God and believers in a Spirit/Life Force are decidedly less likely, and fundamentalists are more likely than non- believers to be racially intolerant. National contexts also matter greatly: individuals living in Europe’s most religious countries, countries with legacies of ethnic-religious conflict and countries with low GDP are significantly more likely to be racially intolerant than those living in wealthier, secular and politically stable countries. This is especially the case for the religiously devout.",
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    Love Thy Neighbor? Relationships between Religion and Racial Intolerance in Europe. / Doebler, Stefanie.

    In: Politics and Religion, 2015.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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