Low-energy cranberry juice decreases lipid oxidation and increases plasma antioxidant capacity in women with metabolic syndrome

Arpita Basu, Nancy M Betts, Jennifer Ortiz, Brandi Simmons, Mingyuan Wu, Timothy J Lyons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

166 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cranberries, high in polyphenols, have been associated with several cardiovascular health benefits, although limited clinical trials have been reported to validate these findings. We tested the hypothesis that commercially available low-energy cranberry juice (Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc, Lakeville-Middleboro, Mass) will decrease surrogate risk factors of cardiovascular disease, such as lipid oxidation, inflammation, and dyslipidemia, in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, participants identified with metabolic syndrome (n = 15-16/group) were assigned to 1 of 2 groups: cranberry juice (480 mL/day) or placebo (480 mL/day) for 8 weeks. Anthropometrics, blood pressure measurements, dietary analyses, and fasting blood draws were conducted at screen and 8 weeks of the study. Cranberry juice significantly increased plasma antioxidant capacity (1.5 ± 0.6 to 2.2 ± 0.4 µmol/L [means ± SD], P <.05) and decreased oxidized low-density lipoprotein and malondialdehyde (120.4 ± 31.0 to 80.4 ± 34.6 U/L and 3.4 ± 1.1 to 1.7 ± 0.7 µmol/L, respectively [means ± SD], P <.05) at 8 weeks vs placebo. However, cranberry juice consumption caused no significant improvements in blood pressure, glucose and lipid profiles, C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6. No changes in these parameters were noted in the placebo group. In conclusion, low-energy cranberry juice (2 cups/day) significantly reduces lipid oxidation and increases plasma antioxidant capacity in women with metabolic syndrome.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)190-6
Number of pages7
JournalNutrition research (New York, N.Y.)
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Antioxidants
  • Beverages
  • Biological Markers
  • C-Reactive Protein
  • Double-Blind Method
  • Female
  • Fruit
  • Humans
  • Interleukin-6
  • Lipid Peroxidation
  • Lipoproteins, LDL
  • Malondialdehyde
  • Metabolic Syndrome X
  • Middle Aged
  • Phytotherapy
  • Risk Factors
  • Vaccinium macrocarpon

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