Low Fidelity Simulation as a Mechanism to Enhance Midwifery Students’ Confidence in Relation to Emergency Obstetric Training

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Simulation offers a safe opportunity for students to practice clinical procedures without exposure and risk of harm to real patients (Partin et al, 2011). Simulation is recognised to increase students’ confidence in their ability to make critical decisions (McCaughey and Traynor, 2010). Within Queen’s University Belfast, simulation for obstetric emergency training based on the ethos of ‘Practical Obstetric Multi-Professional Training[PROMPT]’ (Draycott et al, 2008) has been developed for midwifery students and is now uniquely embedded within the pre-registration curriculum. An important aspect of the PROMPT training is the use of low fidelity simulation as opposed to high tech support (Crofts et al, 2008). Studies have reflected that low fidelity simulation can be an effective tool for promoting student confidence (Tosterud, 2013; Hughes et al, 2013). Students are given the opportunity to experience obstetric emergencies within a safe environment and evaluation has indicated that students feel safe and have an increase in confidence and self-efficacy. The immediacy of the feedback offered by simulated situations encourages an exploration of beliefs and attitudes, particularly with peers, promoting a deeper sense of learning (Stoneham and Feltham, 2009).This paper will discuss why low fidelity simulation can effectively enhance the student experience and promote self-efficacy.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 23 Jun 2015
Event9th Annual UK Simulation in Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Conference - Queen's University Belfast , Belfast , United Kingdom
Duration: 22 Jun 201523 Jun 2015

Conference

Conference9th Annual UK Simulation in Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBelfast
Period22/06/201523/06/2015

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