Magnetoencephalography reveals slowing of resting peak oscillatory frequency in children born very preterm

Sam M Doesburg, Urs Ribary, Anthony T Herdman, Alexander Moiseev, Teresa Cheung, Steven P Miller, Kenneth J Poskitt, Hal Weinberg, Michael F Whitfield, Anne Synnes, Ruth E Grunau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Resting cortical activity is characterized by a distinct spectral peak in the alpha frequency range. Slowing of this oscillatory peak toward the upper theta-band has been associated with a variety of neurological and neuropsychiatric conditions and has been attributed to altered thalamocortical dynamics. Children born very preterm exhibit altered development of thalamocortical systems. To test the hypothesis that peak oscillatory frequency is slowed in children born very preterm, we recorded resting magnetoencephalography (MEG) from school age children born very preterm (= 32 wk gestation) without major intellectual or neurological impairment and age-matched full-term controls. Very preterm children exhibit a slowing of peak frequency toward the theta-band over bilateral frontal cortex, together with reduced alpha-band power over bilateral frontal and temporal cortex, suggesting that mildly dysrhythmic thalamocortical interactions may contribute to altered spontaneous cortical activity in children born very preterm.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)171-5
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Research
Volume70
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Magnetoencephalography reveals slowing of resting peak oscillatory frequency in children born very preterm'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Doesburg, S. M., Ribary, U., Herdman, A. T., Moiseev, A., Cheung, T., Miller, S. P., Poskitt, K. J., Weinberg, H., Whitfield, M. F., Synnes, A., & Grunau, R. E. (2011). Magnetoencephalography reveals slowing of resting peak oscillatory frequency in children born very preterm. Pediatric Research, 70(2), 171-5. https://doi.org/10.1203/PDR.0b013e3182225a9e