Majority group belonging without minority group distancing? Minority experiences of intergroup contact and inequality

Judit Kende*, Gülseli Baysu, Colette Van Laar, Karen Phalet

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As most immigrant-origin minority youth grow up in ethnically diverse social worlds, they develop a sense of belonging to both the national majority and the ethnic minority group. Our study adds to a growing body of research on minority experiences of intergroup contact by (a) including both minority and majority group belonging as outcomes; and (b) examining the interplay of majority contact with unequal treatment. We surveyed 1200 Turkish and Moroccan Belgian minority youth in 315 classrooms across 65 schools, using multiple measures of intergroup contact, unequal treatment in school, and minority and majority group belonging. Multi-level models showed that minority youth who experienced more intergroup contact, and less unequal treatment, reported more belonging to the majority group. In addition, contact predicted less belonging to the minority group only in the presence of unequal treatment: for minority youth who perceived less unequal treatment, either individually or collectively, intergroup contact was unrelated to minority group belonging. We conclude that majority group contact and belonging need not come at the cost of minority group distancing in the absence of inequality.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)121-145
Number of pages25
JournalBritish Journal of Social Psychology
Volume60
Issue number1
Early online date01 May 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Feb 2021

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