Making silence speak through repetition: reconstruction and re-enactment as a means to materialise erased history and sometimes correct it

Don Duncan

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Abstract

How do we revisit and repeat past events of which there is no trace? What does repetition look like to those whose histories and experiences have been erased, denied representation, silenced?

This paper explores tools available to media practitioners wishing to represent pasts that were erased or indeed never acknowledged or represented to begin with. Through my own practice research work – and drawing on theory concerning re-enactment, reconstruction and criticality in media – I explore effective ways to repeat the past, interact with it, intervene on it and ultimately restage it in the present moment as a way to achieve forestalled representation and occasion meaningful public and critical engagement with it.
Original languageEnglish
Article number7
JournalHakara: A Bilingual Journal of Creative Expression
Volume17
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 26 Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

Don Duncan is a writer and media practitioner who also lectures on broadcast practice at Queen’s University, Belfast.

Keywords

  • Repetition
  • Reconstruction
  • Re-enactment
  • Revision
  • Historical justice
  • historical revision
  • media
  • sound
  • documentary

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • General Arts and Humanities
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Communication

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