Mediterranean Diet for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes

Claire T. McEvoy*, Jayne V. Woodside

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The Mediterranean (Med) diet is rich in fruit, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and olive oil and low in red meat and is promoted as a healthy eating model for prevention of diseases such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. This is supported by strong and consistent evidence from epidemiologic studies and some evidence from clinical trials. It is thought that the high antioxidant capacity of the diet reduces oxidative damage and low-grade inflammation. The Med diet has been shown to favorably modify known vascular risk factors, including blood lipid profile, blood pressure, inflammatory markers, insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction. However, further large-scale clinical trials are required to confirm the benefit of a Med diet for prevention of vascular and metabolic disease. This chapter will review the current epidemiologic and clinical trial evidence evaluating a Med diet for prevention of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGlucose Intake and Utilization in Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes
Subtitle of host publicationImplications for Cardiovascular Disease
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages327-339
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9780128005798
ISBN (Print)9780128000939
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Nov 2014

Fingerprint

Mediterranean Diet
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Cardiovascular Diseases
Clinical Trials
Nuts
Metabolic Diseases
Vascular Diseases
Vegetables
Insulin Resistance
Epidemiologic Studies
Fruit
Antioxidants
Diet
Blood Pressure
Inflammation
Lipids

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Mediterranean diet
  • Prevention
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus

Cite this

McEvoy, C. T., & Woodside, J. V. (2014). Mediterranean Diet for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes. In Glucose Intake and Utilization in Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease (pp. 327-339). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800093-9.00026-0
McEvoy, Claire T. ; Woodside, Jayne V. / Mediterranean Diet for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes. Glucose Intake and Utilization in Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease. Elsevier Inc., 2014. pp. 327-339
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McEvoy, CT & Woodside, JV 2014, Mediterranean Diet for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes. in Glucose Intake and Utilization in Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease. Elsevier Inc., pp. 327-339. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800093-9.00026-0

Mediterranean Diet for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes. / McEvoy, Claire T.; Woodside, Jayne V.

Glucose Intake and Utilization in Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease. Elsevier Inc., 2014. p. 327-339.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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McEvoy CT, Woodside JV. Mediterranean Diet for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes. In Glucose Intake and Utilization in Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease. Elsevier Inc. 2014. p. 327-339 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800093-9.00026-0