Metabolomic Profiling of In Vivo Plasma Responses to DioxinAssociated Dietary Contaminant Exposure in Rats: Implications for Identification of Sources of Animal and Human Exposure

Anthony A O'Kane, Olivier P Chevallier, Stewart F Graham, Christopher T Elliott, Mark H Mooney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dioxin contamination of the food chain typically occurs when cocktails of combustion residues or polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) containing oils become incorporated into animal feed. These highly toxic compounds are bioaccumulative with small amounts posing a major health risk. The ability to identify animal exposure to these compounds prior to their entry into the food chain may be an invaluable tool to safeguard public health. Dioxin-like compounds act by a common mode of action and this suggests that markers or patterns of response may facilitate identification of exposed animals. However, secondary co-contaminating compounds present in typical dioxin sources may affect responses to compounds. This study has investigated for the first time the potential of a metabolomics platform to distinguish between animals exposed to different sources of dioxin contamination through their diet. Sprague-Dawley rats were given feed containing dioxin-like toxins from hospital incinerator soot, a common PCB oil standard and pure 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (normalized at 0.1 µg/kg TEQ) and acquired plasma was subsequently biochemically profiled using ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) quadropole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (QTof-MS). An OPLS-DA model was generated from acquired metabolite fingerprints and validated which allowed classification of plasma from individual animals into the four dietary exposure study groups with a level of accuracy of 97-100%. A set of 24 ions of importance to the prediction model, and which had levels significantly altered between feeding groups, were positively identified as deriving from eight identifiable metabolites including lysophosphatidylcholine (16:0) and tyrosine. This study demonstrates the enormous potential of metabolomic-based profiling to provide a powerful and reliable tool for the detection of dioxin exposure in food-producing animals.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5409-18
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental science & technology
Volume47
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 May 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

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