Modulating mythology in a post-traumatic era: Murals and re-imaging in Northern Ireland.

Hilary Downey, John Sherry

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Arguably the most ancient of the social media, wall paintings have been a persistent vehicle of cultural meaning management. The dynamics of myth markets are reflected in the sectarian murals of Northern Ireland. In this paper, we draw from consumer research literature on mythology and street art to explore the continuous revision of these wallscapes that seeks to address the enduring contradictions of civic ideology in contested political space. In particular, we focus on the use of classical, historical and pop-cultural mythologies to transform private space into public place. We examine the decommissioning of murals occurring in the wake of the Peace Accords, and speculate on the implications of the creation of a shared mythology for the future of mural painting and the state.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMyth and the Market: Proceedings of an interdisciplinary conference held in Carlingford, Ireland 19–21 June 2014
PublisherUniversity College Dublin, Press
Pages281-304
Number of pages24
ISBN (Print)9781905254859
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventMyth and the Market - Carlingford, Ireland
Duration: 19 Jun 201421 Jun 2014

Conference

ConferenceMyth and the Market
CountryIreland
CityCarlingford
Period19/06/201421/06/2014

Keywords

  • Mythology, street art, public place, political contestation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Modulating mythology in a post-traumatic era: Murals and re-imaging in Northern Ireland.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Downey, H., & Sherry, J. (2014). Modulating mythology in a post-traumatic era: Murals and re-imaging in Northern Ireland. In Myth and the Market: Proceedings of an interdisciplinary conference held in Carlingford, Ireland 19–21 June 2014 (pp. 281-304). University College Dublin, Press.