Money matters: using qualitative research for policy influencing on gender and welfare reform

Fran Bennett, Sirin Sung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The UK government has been considering the design and delivery of the proposed “universal credit”, the centerpiece of its welfare reforms. The authors draw on findings from their own research, about how low/moderate-income couples manage money and negotiate gender roles, to demonstrate their relevance to exploring the gender implications of the proposals for universal credit. Findings from this and other similar studies are used to explore the value of qualitative research to policy design and debates – in particular to supplement economic modeling, which has been highly influential in driving the current UK government's thinking on welfare reform. The authors discuss the reasons why insights about gender relations within the household revealed by such qualitative research appear to have been resisted in the reform.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-19
Number of pages15
JournalInnovation - The European Journal of Social Science Research
Volume27
Issue number1
Early online date12 Jul 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • welfare reform
  • within-household distribution
  • universal credit
  • gender analysis

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