Negotiating closed doors and constraining deadlines: the potential of visual ethnography to effectually explore private and public spaces of motherhood and parenting.

Dawn Mannay, Jordon Creaghan, Dunla Gallagher, Ruby Marzella, Sherelle Mason, Melanie Morgan, Aimee Grant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)
106 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Pregnancy and motherhood are increasingly subjected to surveillance by medical professionals, the media, and the general public, and discourses of ideal parenting are propagated alongside an admonishment of the perceived “failing” maternal subject. However, despite this scrutiny, the mundane activities of parenting are often impervious to ethnographic forms of inquiry. Challenges for ethnographic researchers include the restrictions of becoming immersed in the private space of the home where parenting occurs and an institutional structure that discourages exploratory and long-term fieldwork. This paper draws on four studies, involving thirty-four participants, that explored their journeys into the space of parenthood and their everyday experiences. The studies all employed forms of visual ethnography, including artifacts, photo elicitation, timelines, collage, and sandboxing. The paper argues that visual methodologies can enable access to unseen aspects of parenting and engender forms of temporal extension, which can help researchers to disrupt the restrictions of tightly time bounded projects.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Contemporary Ethnography.
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Dec 2017

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Negotiating closed doors and constraining deadlines: the potential of visual ethnography to effectually explore private and public spaces of motherhood and parenting.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this