Neuromuscular-skeletal origins of predominant patterns of coordination in a rhythmic two-joint arm movement

A. De Rugy, S. Riek, Richard Carson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors tested for predominant patterns of coordination in the combination of rhythmic flexion-extension (FE) and supination-pronation (SP) at the elbow-joint complex. Participants (N = 10) spontaneously established in-phase (supination synchronized with flexion) and antiphase (pronation synchronized with flexion) patterns. In addition, the authors used a motorized robot arm to generate involuntary SP movements with different phase relations with respect to voluntary FE. The involuntarily induced in-phase pattern was accentuated and was more consistent than other patterns. That result provides evidence that the predominance of the in-phase pattern originates in the influence of neuro-muscular-skeletal constraints rather than in a preference dictated by perceptual-cognitive factors implicated in voluntary control. Neuromuscular-skeletal constraints involved in the predominance of the in-phase and the antiphase patterns are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-14
Number of pages8
JournalJOURNAL OF MOTOR BEHAVIOR
Volume38
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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