No Association Between Vitamin D Status and Risk of Barrett's Esophagus or Esophageal Adenocarcinoma: A Mendelian Randomization Study

Jing Dong, Puya Gharahkhani, Wong-Ho Chow, Marilie D Gammon, Geoffrey Liu, Carlos Caldas, Anna H Wu, Weimin Ye, Lynn Onstad, Lesley Anderson, Leslie Bernstein, Paul Pharoah

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2 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Background
Epidemiological studies on circulating concentrations of 25 hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) and risks of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) have shown conflicting results. Here we conducted a Mendelian randomization study to determine the associations between circulating concentrations of 25 hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) and risks of EAC and its precursor, Barrett’s esophagus (BE).

Methods
We conducted a Mendelian randomization study using a two-sample (summary data) approach. Six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs3755967, rs10741657, rs12785878, rs10745742, rs8018720 and rs17216707) associated with circulating 25(OH)D concentrations were used as instrumental variables. Data from 6,167 BE patients, 4,112 EAC patients and 17,159 control participants were from studies participating in the Barrett’s and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON), as well as studies from Bonn, Germany, and Cambridge and Oxford, United Kingdom. Analyses were performed separately for BE and EAC.

Results
Overall, we found no evidence for an association between genetically estimated 25(OH)D concentration and the risk of BE or EAC. The odds ratio (OR) per 20 nmol/L increase in genetically estimated 25(OH)D concentration for BE risk estimated by combining the individual SNP association using inverse variance weighting was 1.21 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.77-1.92; P = 0.41). The OR for EAC risk estimated by combining the individual SNP association using inverse variance weighting was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.39-1.19; P = 0.18).

Conclusions
This Mendelian randomization study found that low genetically estimated 25(OH)D concentrations were not associated with the risks of BE or EAC.

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