Non-apologies and prolonged silences in post-conflict settings: The case of post-colonial Cyprus

Kathleen Ireton, Iosif Kovras

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Despite the growing use of apologies in post-conflict settings, cases of non-apology remain unaddressed and continue to puzzle scholars. This article focuses on the absence of apology by non-state and anti-state actors by examining the case of the Cypriot armed group EOKA, which has refused to offer an apology to the civilian victims of its ‘anti-colonial’ struggle (1955–1959). Using field data and parliamentary debates, and drawing on comparisons, this article analyses the factors that contributed to a lack of apology. It is argued that the inherited timelessness of Greek nationalism, and the impression of a perpetual need for defence, set up textbook conditions for the development of a hegemonic discourse and prevented an apology for human rights violations.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)71
    Number of pages88
    JournalTime and Society
    Volume21
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

    Keywords

    • Politics of memory
    • Apologies
    • Cyprus

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science

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