Novel DGT method with tri-metal oxide adsorbent for in situ spatiotemporal flux measurement of fluoride in waters and sediments

Chen- Yang Zhou , Dong-Xing Guan , Paul N. Williams, Jun Luo, Lena Q. Ma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)
239 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Natural mineral-water interface reactions drive ecosystem/global fluoride (F−) cycling. These small-scale processes prove challenging to monitoring due to mobilization being highly localized and variable; influenced by changing climate, hydrology, dissolution chemistries and pedogenosis. These release events could be captured in situ by the passive sampling technique, diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT), providing a cost-effective and time-integrated measurement of F− mobilization. However, attempts to develop the method for F− have been unsuccessful due to the very restrictive operational ranges that most F−-absorbents function within. A new hybrid-DGT technique for F− quantification containing a three-phase fine particle composite (Fesingle bondAlsingle bondCe, FAC) adsorbent was developed and evaluated. Sampler response was validated in laboratory and field deployments, passing solution chemistry QC within ionic strength and pH ranges of 0–200 mmol L−1 and 4.3–9.1, respectively, and exhibiting high sorption capacities (98 ± 8 μg cm−2). FAC-DGT measurements adequately predicted up to weeklong averaged in situ F− fluvial fluxes in a freshwater river and F− concentrations in a wastewater treatment flume determined by high frequency active sampling. While, millimetre-scale diffusive fluxes across the sediment-water interface were modeled for three contrasting lake bed sediments from a F−-enriched lake using the new FAC-DGT platform.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)200-208
Number of pages9
JournalWater Research
Volume99
Early online date28 Apr 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Aug 2016

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