Obesity, dietary fats, and gastrointestinal cancer risk-potential mechanisms relating to lipid metabolism and inflammation

Kathleen A. J. Mitchelson, Fiona O’Connell, Jacintha O’Sullivan, Helen M. Roche

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
38 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Obesity is a major driving factor in the incidence, progression, and poor treatment response in gastrointestinal cancers. Herein, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of the impact of obesity and its resulting metabolic perturbations across four gastrointestinal cancer types, namely, oesophageal, gastric, liver, and colorectal cancer. Importantly, not all obese phenotypes are equal. Obese adipose tissue heterogeneity depends on the location, structure, cellular profile (including resident immune cell populations), and dietary fatty acid intake. We discuss whether adipose heterogeneity impacts the tumorigenic environment. Dietary fat quality, in particular saturated fatty acids, promotes a hypertrophic, pro-inflammatory adipose profile, in contrast to monounsaturated fatty acids, resulting in a hyperplastic, less inflammatory adipose phenotype. The purpose of this review is to examine the impact of obesity, including dietary fat quality, on adipose tissue biology and oncogenesis, specifically focusing on lipid metabolism and inflammatory mechanisms. This is achieved with a particular focus on gastrointestinal cancers as exemplar models of obesity-associated cancers.
Original languageEnglish
Article number42
Number of pages23
JournalMetabolites
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jan 2024

Keywords

  • Molecular Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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