On the complexity of the water-gas shift reaction mechanism over a Pt/CeO2 catalyst: Effect of the temperature on the reactivity of formate surface species studied by operando DRIFT during isotopic transient at chemical steady-state

Frederic Meunier, Daniele Tibiletti, Alexandre Goguet, Sergiy Shekhtman, Christopher Hardacre, Robbie Burch

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Abstract

The present report investigates the role of formate species as potential reaction intermediates for the WGS reaction (CO + H2O -> CO2 + H-2) over a Pt-CeO2 catalyst. A combination of operando techniques, i.e., in situ diffuse reflectance FT-IR (DRIFT) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS) during steady-state isotopic transient kinetic analysis (SSITKA), was used to relate the exchange of the reaction product CO2 to that of surface formate species. The data presented here suggest that a switchover from a non-formate to a formate-based mechanism could take place over a very narrow temperature range (as low as 60 K) over our Pt-CeO2 catalyst. This observation clearly stresses the need to avoid extrapolating conclusions to the case of results obtained under even slightly different experimental conditions. The occurrence of a low-temperature mechanism, possibly redox or Mars van Krevelen-like, that deactivates above 473 K because of ceria over-reduction is suggested as a possible explanation for the switchover, similarly to the case of the CO-NO reaction over Cu, I'd and Rh-CeZrOx (see Kaspar and co-workers [1-3]). (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-147
Number of pages5
JournalCatalysis Today
Volume126 (1-2)
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Aug 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Process Chemistry and Technology

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