Out-group trust, intergroup anxiety, and out-group attitude as mediators of the effect of imagined intergroup contact on intergroup behavioural tendencies.

Rhiannon Turner, Keon West, Zara Christie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated whether imagining contact with an out-group member would change behavioral tendencies toward the out-group. In Experiment 1, British high school students who imagined talking to an asylum seeker reported a stronger tendency to approach asylum seekers than did participants in a control condition. Path analysis revealed this relationship was mediated by out-group trust and, marginally, by out-group attitude. In Experiment 2, straight undergraduates who imagined an interaction with a gay individual reported a stronger tendency to approach, and a weaker tendency to avoid, gay people. Path analyses showed that these relationships were mediated by out-group trust, out-group attitude, and less intergroup anxiety. These findings highlight the potential practical importance of imagined contact and important mediators of its effects.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E196-E205
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume43
Issue numberS2
Early online date09 May 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

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