Perceptions of high-involvement work practices and burnout: the mediating role of job demands

Steven Kilroy, Patrick C. Flood, Janine Bosak, Denis Chenevert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)
682 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study examined the impact of perceived high-involvement work practices on job demands (role conflict, role overload and role ambiguity) and burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation). The study was conducted in a Canadian general hospital. Findings from structural equation modelling (N = 545) revealed that perceived HIWPs were significantly and negatively related to job demands and burnout. Role conflict and role overload have a significant positive association with emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation. Finally, role conflict and role overload partially mediate the relationship between perceived HIWPs and burnout. We discuss the theoretical and managerial implications of these findings for our understanding of how HIWPs influence the job demands and burnout of employees.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages17
JournalHuman Resource Management Journal
Early online date09 Jun 2016
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 09 Jun 2016

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