Personalising Crime and Crime-fighting in Factual Television: an Analysis of Social Actors and Transitivity in Language and Images

David Machin, Andrea Mayr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article addresses the lack of work on media and crime in Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), using an example of a factual television crime report. The existing research in media studies and criminology points to the way that the media misrepresents crime by distorting public understandings and backgrounding structural issues, such as poverty, which are related to crime thereby legitimising a criminal justice system that serves the interests of the powerful in society. Using social actor and transitivity analysis, this article shows how multimodal CDA can make an important contribution as it reveals the more subtle linguistic strategies and visual representations by which this process is accomplished, showing how each plays a part in the recontextualisation of social practice. This programme backgrounds which crimes are committed but foregrounds mental states and the neutrality of policing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)356-372
Number of pages16
JournalCritical Discourse Studies
Volume10
Issue number4
Early online date30 Jul 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

crime fighting
social actor
television
offense
language
discourse analysis
criminology
neutrality
justice
poverty
linguistics
lack

Bibliographical note

Special Issue: Multimodal Critical Discourse Studies

Keywords

  • multimodality, crime
  • critical discourse analysis

Cite this

@article{3d1fc84a573249dfac3891871e1c1e56,
title = "Personalising Crime and Crime-fighting in Factual Television: an Analysis of Social Actors and Transitivity in Language and Images",
abstract = "This article addresses the lack of work on media and crime in Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), using an example of a factual television crime report. The existing research in media studies and criminology points to the way that the media misrepresents crime by distorting public understandings and backgrounding structural issues, such as poverty, which are related to crime thereby legitimising a criminal justice system that serves the interests of the powerful in society. Using social actor and transitivity analysis, this article shows how multimodal CDA can make an important contribution as it reveals the more subtle linguistic strategies and visual representations by which this process is accomplished, showing how each plays a part in the recontextualisation of social practice. This programme backgrounds which crimes are committed but foregrounds mental states and the neutrality of policing.",
keywords = "multimodality, crime, critical discourse analysis",
author = "David Machin and Andrea Mayr",
note = "Special Issue: Multimodal Critical Discourse Studies",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1080/17405904.2013.813771",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "356--372",
journal = "Critical Discourse Studies",
issn = "1740-5904",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "4",

}

Personalising Crime and Crime-fighting in Factual Television : an Analysis of Social Actors and Transitivity in Language and Images. / Machin, David ; Mayr, Andrea.

In: Critical Discourse Studies, Vol. 10, No. 4, 2013, p. 356-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Personalising Crime and Crime-fighting in Factual Television

T2 - an Analysis of Social Actors and Transitivity in Language and Images

AU - Machin, David

AU - Mayr, Andrea

N1 - Special Issue: Multimodal Critical Discourse Studies

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - This article addresses the lack of work on media and crime in Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), using an example of a factual television crime report. The existing research in media studies and criminology points to the way that the media misrepresents crime by distorting public understandings and backgrounding structural issues, such as poverty, which are related to crime thereby legitimising a criminal justice system that serves the interests of the powerful in society. Using social actor and transitivity analysis, this article shows how multimodal CDA can make an important contribution as it reveals the more subtle linguistic strategies and visual representations by which this process is accomplished, showing how each plays a part in the recontextualisation of social practice. This programme backgrounds which crimes are committed but foregrounds mental states and the neutrality of policing.

AB - This article addresses the lack of work on media and crime in Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), using an example of a factual television crime report. The existing research in media studies and criminology points to the way that the media misrepresents crime by distorting public understandings and backgrounding structural issues, such as poverty, which are related to crime thereby legitimising a criminal justice system that serves the interests of the powerful in society. Using social actor and transitivity analysis, this article shows how multimodal CDA can make an important contribution as it reveals the more subtle linguistic strategies and visual representations by which this process is accomplished, showing how each plays a part in the recontextualisation of social practice. This programme backgrounds which crimes are committed but foregrounds mental states and the neutrality of policing.

KW - multimodality, crime

KW - critical discourse analysis

U2 - 10.1080/17405904.2013.813771

DO - 10.1080/17405904.2013.813771

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 356

EP - 372

JO - Critical Discourse Studies

JF - Critical Discourse Studies

SN - 1740-5904

IS - 4

ER -