Physical and immunoaffinity extraction of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins from cultures of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense

R.A. Devlin, Katrina Campbell, K. Kawatsu, Christopher Elliott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the present study the extraction of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins from a toxic strain of the marine dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense CCMP-1493 using various mechanical and/or physical procedures was investigated. PBS buffer was investigated as the extraction solvent in order for these procedures to be used directly with immuno-magnetic Ferrospheres-N. The extraction was performed following the determination of when toxin content by the algae was at its highest during batch culture. The methods used for cell lysis and toxin extraction included freeze-thawing, freeze-boiling, steel ball bearing beating, glass bead beating, and sonication. The steel ball bearing beating was determined to release a similar amount of toxin when compared to a modified standard extraction method which was reported to release 100% of toxins from the algal cells and was therefore used in the next phase of the study. This next phase was to determine the feasibility of utilising an antibody coupled to novel magnetic microspheres (Ferrospheres-N) as a simple, rapid immune-capture procedure for PSP toxins extracted from the algae. The effects of increasing mass of Ferrospheres-N on the immuno-capture of the PSP toxins from the toxic algal strain extracts were investigated. Toxin recovery was found to increase when an increasing mass of Ferrospheres-N was used until 96.2% (+/- 1.3 SD) of the toxin extracted from the cells was captured and eluted. Toxin recovery was determined by comparison to an appropriate PSP toxin standard curve following analysis by the AOAC HPLC method. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)542-548
Number of pages7
JournalHarmful Algae
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Plant Science

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