Polar distribution of ablated atomic material during the pulsed laser deposition of Cu in vacuum: Dependence on focused laser spot size and power density

I. Weaver, Ciaran Lewis

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Abstract

Experiments have been carried out to investigate the polar distribution of atomic material ablated during the pulsed laser deposition of Cu in vacuum. Data were obtained as functions of focused laser spot size and power density. Thin films were deposited onto flat glass substrates and thickness profiles were transformed into polar atomic flux distributions of the form f(theta)=cos(n) theta. At constant focused laser power density on target, I=4.7+/-0.3X10(8) W/cm(2), polar distributions were found to broaden with a reduction in the focused laser spot size. The polar distribution exponent n varied from 15+/-2 to 7+/-1 for focused laser spot diameter variation from 2.5 to 1.4 mm, respectively, with the laser beam exhibiting a circular aspect on target. With the focused laser spot size held constant at phi=1.8 mm, polar distributions were observed to broaden with a reduction in the focused laser power density on target, with the associated polar distribution exponent n varying from 13+/-1.5 to 8+/-1 for focused laser power density variation from 8.3+/-0.3X10(8) to 2.2+/-0.1X10(8) W/cm(2) respectively. Data were compared with an analytical model available within the literature, which correctly predicts broadening of the polar distribution with a reduction in focused laser spot size and with a reduction in focused laser power density, although the experimentally observed magnitude was greater than that predicted in both cases. (C) 1996 American Institute of Physics.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7216-7222
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Applied Physics
Volume79
Publication statusPublished - 1996

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