Post-War Cinema-Going and Working-Class Communities: A Case Study of the Holyland, Belfast, 1945–1962

Sam Manning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

This article utilizes oral history testimony to investigate cinema-going practices in the Holyland, a largely Protestant working-class community in post-war Belfast. It investigates the place-specific nature of cinema attendance, assesses the social practices of cinema-going and examines the reasons for the post-war decline in attendance and consequent cinema closures. Oral history testimony demonstrates the close link between the nature of cinema attendance, changes in the life cycle and urban mobility. By linking the recollections of post-war cinema-goers to broader social and economic developments in Belfast, and assessing Northern Ireland's relationship to the rest of the United Kingdom, this article investigates the reasons for the closure of the Apollo, the local neighbourhood cinema for residents of the Holyland.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)539-555
Journalcultural and social history
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Oct 2016

Keywords

  • Cinema
  • Belfast
  • Northern Ireland
  • Leisure
  • Oral History

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