Practical guidelines: Lung transplantation in patients with cystic fibrosis

T. O. Hirche, C. Knoop, H. Hebestreit, D. Shimmin, A. Solé, J. S. Elborn, H. Ellemunter, P. Aurora, M. Hogardt, T. O F Wagner*, Study Group Ecorn-Cf Study Group

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

There are no European recommendations on issues specifically related to lung transplantation (LTX) in cystic fibrosis (CF). The main goal of this paper is to provide CF care team members with clinically relevant CF-specific information on all aspects of LTX, highlighting areas of consensus and controversy throughout Europe. Bilateral lung transplantation has been shown to be an important therapeutic option for end-stage CF pulmonary disease. Transplant function and patient survival after transplantation are better than in most other indications for this procedure. Attention though has to be paid to pretransplant morbidity, time for referral, evaluation, indication, and contraindication in children and in adults. This review makes extensive use of specific evidence in the field of lung transplantation in CF patients and addresses all issues of practical importance. The requirements of pre-, peri-, and postoperative management are discussed in detail including bridging to transplant and postoperative complications, immune suppression, chronic allograft dysfunction, infection, and malignancies being the most important. Among the contributors to this guiding information are 19 members of the ECORN-CF project and other experts. The document is endorsed by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society and sponsored by the Christiane Herzog Foundation. 

Original languageEnglish
Article number621342
Number of pages22
JournalPulmonary Medicine
Volume2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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