Predictors of place of death for those in receipt of home-based palliative care services in Ontario, Canada

Denise Guerriere, Amna Husain, Dinese Marshall, Brandon Zagorski, Hsien Seow, Kevin Brazil, Julia Kennedy, Robin McLernon, Sheri Burns, Peter C. Coyte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many cancer patients die in institutional settings despite their preference to die at home. A longitudinal, prospective cohort study was conducted to comprehensively assess the determinants of home death for patients receiving home-based palliative care. Data collected from biweekly telephone interviews with caregivers (n=302) and program databases were entered into a multivariate logistic model. Patients with high nursing costs (odds ratio [OR]: 4.3; confidence interval [CI]: 1.8-10.2) and patients with high personal support worker costs (OR: 2.3; CI: 1.1-4.5) were more likely to die at home than those with low costs. Patients who lived alone were less likely to die at home than those who cohabitated (OR: 0.4; CI: 0.2-0.8), and those with a high propensity for a home-death preference were more likely to die at home than those with a low propensity (OR: 5.8; CI: 1.1-31.3). An understanding of the predictors of place of death may contribute to the development of effective interventions that support home death.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)76-88
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Palliative Care
Volume31
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2015

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