Preliminary epidemiological findings of a study looking at Tardive Dyskinesia in a population of patients with schizophrenia & poor outcome schizoaffective disorder in Northern Ireland

P. W. Miller, T. O'Neill, J. McCusker, G. Colgan, A. Nolan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study describes the interim epidemiological findings relating to Tardive Dyskinesia for probands with schizophrenia, or poor outcome schizoaffective disorder. This sample will be genotyped for DRD3 and CYP1A2; both parents DNA is available. The study aims to collect 200 trios at completion. TD is a syndrome of abnormal involuntary movements, usually thought of as the most serious of the movement disorders resulting from neuroleptic drug-use, due to its high prevalence and potential irreversibility. The data available includes Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale, current medication at time of assessment and age of onset of illness. Data was entered and analysed using Pin Point & SPSS. Schooler & Kane Research Criteria for Tardive Dyskinesia applied. Results of the preliminary analysis (n = 42) shows a prevalence of TD of 27.9%, in keeping with the published literature for this group of patients (20-30%, Kane & Smith, 1982). Of note 74% of probands were taking atypical neuroleptics. A significant relationship between TD and depo neuroleptic was found (P = 0.019) Although it is a relatively young population, TD shows a trend of being associated with older chronological age. Analysis of a larger group of probands is currently underway and genotyping will begin later this year.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)606
Number of pages1
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics - Neuropsychiatric Genetics
Volume105
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - 08 Oct 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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