Prostate cancer and the impact on couples: a qualitative metasynthesis

N. Collaco, C. Rivas, L. Matheson, J Nayoan, R. Wagland, O. Alexis, Anna Gavin, A. Glaser, E. Watson

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract
PURPOSE:
To review and interpret existing qualitative literature on the experiences of couples affected by prostate cancer (PCa).

METHODS:
A metasynthesis was carried out which included a systematic search of seven databases between 2000 and 2016. A modified version of Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnographic approach was used to synthesise qualitative study findings and inform overarching interpretations.

RESULTS:
Thirty-seven studies focusing on the experiences of men with PCa and their partner dyad were included producing seven interconnected constructs. The construct accepting change vs seeking continuity reflects the range of ways individuals within the dyad and couples adjust to the diagnosis. Cultivating connection vs disengaging illustrates how couples seek to manage the impact of PCa and its treatment on their relationship, which may lead to a threatened identity, including sexual insecurities. Shielding me, you and us reflects the ways in which couples strive to protect themselves as individuals and/or each other from the impact of PCa. Being a partner and its challenges highlights the responsibilities partners assume and the impact of their supporting role. Yet, partners sometimes report feeling unsupported and side-lined both by the man they are caring for and by healthcare professionals. Couples often recognise the value of facing PCa together.

CONCLUSIONS:
PCa affects both members of the dyad as individuals, as well as the couple's relationship. How best to support couples and how to overcome difficulties in expressing their concerns to one another requires further consideration. Healthcare professionals should endeavour to employ a couple-focused approach where appropriate.

KEYWORDS:
Couples; Dyad; Oncology; Partner experience; Prostate cancer; Qualitative metasynthesis
Original languageEnglish
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 06 Mar 2018

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Prostatic Neoplasms
Delivery of Health Care
Hares
Emotions
Databases

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Collaco, N., Rivas, C., Matheson, L., Nayoan, J., Wagland, R., Alexis, O., ... Watson, E. (2018). Prostate cancer and the impact on couples: a qualitative metasynthesis. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00520-018-4134-0
Collaco, N. ; Rivas, C. ; Matheson, L. ; Nayoan, J ; Wagland, R. ; Alexis, O. ; Gavin, Anna ; Glaser, A. ; Watson, E. / Prostate cancer and the impact on couples: a qualitative metasynthesis.
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abstract = "AbstractPURPOSE:To review and interpret existing qualitative literature on the experiences of couples affected by prostate cancer (PCa).METHODS:A metasynthesis was carried out which included a systematic search of seven databases between 2000 and 2016. A modified version of Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnographic approach was used to synthesise qualitative study findings and inform overarching interpretations.RESULTS:Thirty-seven studies focusing on the experiences of men with PCa and their partner dyad were included producing seven interconnected constructs. The construct accepting change vs seeking continuity reflects the range of ways individuals within the dyad and couples adjust to the diagnosis. Cultivating connection vs disengaging illustrates how couples seek to manage the impact of PCa and its treatment on their relationship, which may lead to a threatened identity, including sexual insecurities. Shielding me, you and us reflects the ways in which couples strive to protect themselves as individuals and/or each other from the impact of PCa. Being a partner and its challenges highlights the responsibilities partners assume and the impact of their supporting role. Yet, partners sometimes report feeling unsupported and side-lined both by the man they are caring for and by healthcare professionals. Couples often recognise the value of facing PCa together.CONCLUSIONS:PCa affects both members of the dyad as individuals, as well as the couple's relationship. How best to support couples and how to overcome difficulties in expressing their concerns to one another requires further consideration. Healthcare professionals should endeavour to employ a couple-focused approach where appropriate.KEYWORDS:Couples; Dyad; Oncology; Partner experience; Prostate cancer; Qualitative metasynthesis",
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Collaco, N, Rivas, C, Matheson, L, Nayoan, J, Wagland, R, Alexis, O, Gavin, A, Glaser, A & Watson, E 2018, 'Prostate cancer and the impact on couples: a qualitative metasynthesis'. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00520-018-4134-0

Prostate cancer and the impact on couples: a qualitative metasynthesis. / Collaco, N.; Rivas, C.; Matheson, L.; Nayoan, J; Wagland, R.; Alexis, O.; Gavin, Anna; Glaser, A.; Watson, E.

2018.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

TY - CONF

T1 - Prostate cancer and the impact on couples: a qualitative metasynthesis

AU - Collaco, N.

AU - Rivas, C.

AU - Matheson, L.

AU - Nayoan, J

AU - Wagland, R.

AU - Alexis, O.

AU - Gavin, Anna

AU - Glaser, A.

AU - Watson, E.

PY - 2018/3/6

Y1 - 2018/3/6

N2 - AbstractPURPOSE:To review and interpret existing qualitative literature on the experiences of couples affected by prostate cancer (PCa).METHODS:A metasynthesis was carried out which included a systematic search of seven databases between 2000 and 2016. A modified version of Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnographic approach was used to synthesise qualitative study findings and inform overarching interpretations.RESULTS:Thirty-seven studies focusing on the experiences of men with PCa and their partner dyad were included producing seven interconnected constructs. The construct accepting change vs seeking continuity reflects the range of ways individuals within the dyad and couples adjust to the diagnosis. Cultivating connection vs disengaging illustrates how couples seek to manage the impact of PCa and its treatment on their relationship, which may lead to a threatened identity, including sexual insecurities. Shielding me, you and us reflects the ways in which couples strive to protect themselves as individuals and/or each other from the impact of PCa. Being a partner and its challenges highlights the responsibilities partners assume and the impact of their supporting role. Yet, partners sometimes report feeling unsupported and side-lined both by the man they are caring for and by healthcare professionals. Couples often recognise the value of facing PCa together.CONCLUSIONS:PCa affects both members of the dyad as individuals, as well as the couple's relationship. How best to support couples and how to overcome difficulties in expressing their concerns to one another requires further consideration. Healthcare professionals should endeavour to employ a couple-focused approach where appropriate.KEYWORDS:Couples; Dyad; Oncology; Partner experience; Prostate cancer; Qualitative metasynthesis

AB - AbstractPURPOSE:To review and interpret existing qualitative literature on the experiences of couples affected by prostate cancer (PCa).METHODS:A metasynthesis was carried out which included a systematic search of seven databases between 2000 and 2016. A modified version of Noblit and Hare's meta-ethnographic approach was used to synthesise qualitative study findings and inform overarching interpretations.RESULTS:Thirty-seven studies focusing on the experiences of men with PCa and their partner dyad were included producing seven interconnected constructs. The construct accepting change vs seeking continuity reflects the range of ways individuals within the dyad and couples adjust to the diagnosis. Cultivating connection vs disengaging illustrates how couples seek to manage the impact of PCa and its treatment on their relationship, which may lead to a threatened identity, including sexual insecurities. Shielding me, you and us reflects the ways in which couples strive to protect themselves as individuals and/or each other from the impact of PCa. Being a partner and its challenges highlights the responsibilities partners assume and the impact of their supporting role. Yet, partners sometimes report feeling unsupported and side-lined both by the man they are caring for and by healthcare professionals. Couples often recognise the value of facing PCa together.CONCLUSIONS:PCa affects both members of the dyad as individuals, as well as the couple's relationship. How best to support couples and how to overcome difficulties in expressing their concerns to one another requires further consideration. Healthcare professionals should endeavour to employ a couple-focused approach where appropriate.KEYWORDS:Couples; Dyad; Oncology; Partner experience; Prostate cancer; Qualitative metasynthesis

U2 - 10.1007/s00520-018-4134-0

DO - 10.1007/s00520-018-4134-0

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Collaco N, Rivas C, Matheson L, Nayoan J, Wagland R, Alexis O et al. Prostate cancer and the impact on couples: a qualitative metasynthesis. 2018. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00520-018-4134-0