Protest practice and (tree) cultures of conflict: understanding the spaces of ‘tree maiming’ in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century England

Carl Griffin

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Developing understandings of protest and cultures of resistance has been a central theme of the 'new' cultural geography of the 1990s and 2000s. But whilst geographers of the here and now have been highly sensitive to the importance of acts of protest which occur outside of the context of broader social movements, geographers concerned with past protests have tended to focus overwhelmingly upon either understanding the development of social movements or highly specific place-based studies. Through a focus upon the hitherto ignored practice of 'tree maiming', this paper demonstrates not only the value of examining specific protest practices in helping to better understand the complexity of conflict, but also how in periods of acute socio-economic change the evolving relationship between humans and the non-human – in this case trees – is a central discourse to the protest practices of the poor. Such attacks often involved complex cultural understandings about the ways in which trees should – and should not – be socially enrolled.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)91-108
    Number of pages18
    JournalTransactions of the Institute of British Geographers
    Volume40 (1)
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2008

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Geography, Planning and Development

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