Racist harassment in the white hinterlands: minority ethnic children and parents' experiences in schools in Northern Ireland

Paul Connolly, M. Keenan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article explores the nature and extent of racist harassment in predominantly white areas. It is based upon a case study of Northern Ireland and draws upon data from indepth interviews with a total of 32 children and 43 parents drawn from the four largest minority ethnic groups in the region: Chinese, Irish Travellers, South Asians and Black Africans. The article demonstrates that racist harassment is a significant problem in schools in Northern Ireland and highlights the varied forms that it can take from overt acts of physical and verbal abuse to more covert and subtle forms of teasing and 'friendly' banter. Following a consideration of the differing responses that schools have made to racist incidents reported to them by children and/or parents, the article concludes by considering the implications of the findings and re-affirming the argument that anti-racist strategies are as relevant and necessary for schools in predominantly white regions as they are in multi-ethnic areas.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)341-356
    Number of pages15
    JournalBritish Journal of Sociology of Education
    Volume23(3)
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2002

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Education
    • Sociology and Political Science

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Racist harassment in the white hinterlands: minority ethnic children and parents' experiences in schools in Northern Ireland'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this